Archive for November, 2021

Psychological safety is the response that you get

Paul O’Neill and Tim Dalmau recently wrote a paper that outlined the processes that occur inside a person when they feel psychological safety. As a follow-up paper they look at all the forces that can operate in group settings to make individuals unsafe, the process behind it and what we can do about it as leaders.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail

The Great Resignation: real or not?

In 2021 the catch-phrase ‘the great resignation’ has been seen splashed across Australian headlines and in the media. The phrase, coined in the United States in late 2020 refers to a surge amongst American’s in quitting their jobs, as a response to Covid-19, and was seen to be gaining momentum as communities learn to live with Covid.

Are we seeing the same phenomenon here in Australia? Australian Bureau of Statistics data does not seem to indicate that this is real, at least so far. However, rather than debating whether this is a real phenomenon, more importantly for leaders of organizations, is to really understand to navigate the inevitable conflicts and dilemmas in moving to a new way of working, post the acute phase of Covid-19.

Ian Sampson and Jill Tideman have written a short paper outlining an approach founded on creating the conditions for meaningful dialogue and conversation between leaders and employees themselves. This type of approach is essential for complex problems such those associated with workforce management and dynamics.  It is also applicable to a whole range of other complex problems that are best addressed by taking a whole of systems approach.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail

Unconscious bias: how to become more aware of personal bias.

The perception of one’s age, gender, gender identity, physical abilities, religion, sexual orientation, weight, and many other characteristics are subject to bias by the [erceiver. None of us are immune to having biases, both consciously and unconsciously. In workplaces, it is everywhere but can be particularly impactful with respect to recruitment, and in performance management.

Unconscious or implicit bias is an automatic reaction we have towards other people. Everyone holds unconscious beliefs about various social groups, and these biases stem from one’s tendency to organize social worlds by categorizing. These attitudes and stereotypes can negatively impact our understanding, actions, and decision-making. They can lead to instinctive assumptions such as a nurse must be a woman, or an engineer must be a man, that men are more credible leaders or those of another race or skin-tone are untrustworthy. In extreme cases it leads to reactions such as the ‘Black Lives Matter’ social movement driven by the perceived bias against black people in the US that they are more likely than not to be criminals. In many cases it is so deeply woven into our cultural fabric that it is hard to be aware of it.

Read More…
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail