Ideas and Insights


The leader as a source of contagious destruction

Much has happened in the last two decades to re-shape our understanding of the effect we have on one another. There was a time when we used to think we were independent, autonomous agents who chose to react (or not) to another’s behavior. Those days are well and truly gone.

Read more…

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Team development: a guide

Teams are the core operational unit of all organizations – no matter how small or large. Forming, building and sustaining functional and high performing teams is at the heart of managers' roles, and yet is a constant dilemma for them – how to effectively develop teams?

 To assist, here is the first in a series of handbooks or guides for team development. It provides an introduction to what makes effective team development. Over the coming months, additional handbooks will be available that will provide a framework and practical activities and approaches to help you build a flourishing and performing team.

Just enter your email address below to receive your free copy of the Team Development Guide

Jill Tideman

 

 

 

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Receiving feedback

It was Ken Blanchard who supposedly said that feedback is the breakfast of champions. Here are 8 simple tips for receiving feedback

Above all else breathe! Move your body (significantly), avert your gaze momentarily, and then take two deep breaths.

Do not look at the person. Do not maintain eye contact. Look to the side and nod your head in acknowledgement to the rhythm of the other person’s speech. Despite everything you have been told to maintain eye contact it is actually counter-productive when dealing with volatile information. It will only male you tense and slow down your thinking and do the same for the other person.

Never argue; just say thanks. Remember, another person’s feedback is about their experience of you not about you.

Don’t let any clarifying questions you have turn into a defense of your position.

Think carefully and slowly about what they have said to you. Don’t immediately reject or immediately reject what the other person has said

Go ask someone else whom you know for their frank honesty with you about how they see the issue and be careful when doing this not to “lead the witness”. In other words, triangulate the feedback.

Look for opportunities to stop doing or start doing critiqued behaviors.

If you feel the criticism was justified and you are better off for it, don’t forget to close the loop and share your progress with the feedback giver.

If you don’t know to change the behavior then ask for help or seek a coach.

Cathy Taylor

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Creating psychological safety in teams

I get to work with teams and groups of all shapes and sizes; from dusty mining crews, to cool urbane executive teams and all in between.  You do not need to be with them long to get a sense of how well the members of the team gel. In other words, the level of trust in the group.

Back in 2013, Steve Zuieback wrote an article, Trust: Cause, Effect or Process, building on the work of Jack Gibb. His Trust Cycle shows 6 steps or actions, that if repeated builds trust in teams. These include,

  • Sharing critical information
  • Experiencing openness
  • Experience more trust
  • Commit to common work
  • Learn as you go
  • Create and document results

In addition to these, my colleague Tim Dalmau often talks about “creating safety” in groups. By this he means psychological safety.

Psychological safety means that there is certainty (in terms of behaviors and decisions by those in power) and people feel safe. Read more…

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Tips for improving contributions in meetings

Click here for a copy of some tips to help you make better contributions in meetings, enhancing the overall quality, effectiveness and efficiency of  meetings in which you participate.

Related Ideas and Insights articles are Breathing 101 and Go Visual!

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Breathing 101

Often it is the simple things that make the most difference…and breathing is one of those things.

Breathing is something we do not need to learn – from the moment we are born to the moment we leave this life, it is for most of us, an unconscious part of our lives.

Breathing and communication

In addition to the fundamental purpose of taking air into our lungs and exhaling carbon dioxide from our lungs thereby allowing for oxygenation of our blood to keep us alive and removing the ‘waste’ gases from respiration from our body, breathing is also fundamental to communication.

Breathing allows us to communicate through speech, and allows us to enhance our communication skills and to influence others enormously.

So… there are definitely things about breathing that we can learn, practice and deliberately use to improve our communication skills. Read more…

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Go visual! – the most important tool to improve communication

The guru of non-verbal communication, Michael Grinder says that “go visual” is the most important non-verbal tool you can use to be an effective communicator

Efficient and effective communication of messages and improved ability to influence is vital. Often as communicators if we just give information verbally we need to repeat the message, or the message is not heard or lost. For example, this is especially the case, when medical practitioners communicate with patients. The doctor who shows the patient the result on a computer screen, draws a diagram on a whiteboard, or notes a few words on a scrap of paper will produce much higher comprehension and retention of that information in the patient. The patient whose doctor simply tells or explains the diagnosis will retain at best about 10% of the information. Read more…

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Leading teams to be their best

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Leading teams to be their best

Tim Dalmau and Michael Grinder will conduct a workshop in Adelaide for people who seek to lead teams to perform at their very best,  March 9th  – 10th, 2016 in Adelaide.

Would you like to get your group or team working collaboratively, be innovative, deal with conflict, be aligned and cohesive? Above all, would like to help them to perform at their very best?

Tim Dalmau and Michael Grinder will again conduct a special training event.. This time you will learn ways you can get the best from your team.

This training is for you if you are a leader, executive, educator, middle manager or supervisor who leads a team of people.

You will have the opportunity to work on your own specific needs under the guidance and skill of both Michael Grinder and Tim Dalmau

This is not a workshop of theory, but practical how to’s. Read more…

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The Key to Aligned Action

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Over the past 20 years we have used a model to explain why so much good communication that occurs in corporations with groups of people and other large institutions is ultimately wasted effort.  This is particularly the case when leaders seek to communicate information to a group of employees in the expectation that it will lead to some form of aligned action.
In the past few months it has become clear how much this particular framework resonates with clients. Over the years we have received a number of requests to publish it.
This paper is a response to those requests. Click here to read or download a copy.

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Interpreting your observations

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To be an effective observer of the human condition we walk a fine line. On the one hand, observation without interpretation is useless; yet on the other hand, interpretation without verifiable evidence is dangerous. When we observe a situation or interaction, our mind naturally interprets it based on the model of communication with which we are familiar

It is more useful to consider three interpretations for a given situation. Read more…

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Buy Tim & Steve’s Book

''A truly useful and practical book'' Rich Shapiro, EY

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