Ideas and Insights


Assessing team development needs – Handbook #3

The third handbook in a series on Team Development gives you guidance in how to assess your team’s development needs.

In the previous Handbook,  #2 a nine-dimensional framework was outlined to provide a structure for your approach. In this handbook there is an approach suggested for determining what are the priority areas for focus are for your team.

Just enter your details below to receive your free copy of the handbook, Assessing team development needs.

 

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Review: One Mission: How leaders build a team of teams

One Mission: How Leaders Build a Team of Teams, by Chris Fussell and C.W. Goodyear published in 2017, follows on from the highly successful book, Team of Teams, that Chris co-authored with General Stanley McChrystal and others in 2015. General McChrystal, was commander of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) whose last assignment was commanding all U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan. He is currently a senior fellow at Yale’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and co-founder of the McChrystal Group, a leadership consulting firm where Chris Fussell and C.W Goodyear are his colleagues.

Generally, I would not be attracted to a management book written by military men, whose ideas are rooted in their military experience. I know this says more about me and my biases, but my assumption was that the military experience is very different from the corporate and organizational world – and I was sceptical of the relevance to that world. I eventually picked it up to read on the recommendation of my colleague, Tim Dalmau, whose judgement in this area I respect. Read more…

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The leader as a source of contagious destruction

Much has happened in the last two decades to re-shape our understanding of the effect we have on one another. There was a time when we used to think we were independent, autonomous agents who chose to react (or not) to another’s behavior. Those days are well and truly gone.

Read more…

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Going beyond information exchange: good questioning skills

As far as we are aware, humans are the only creatures that ask questions. This shows a level of self-insight: that we don’t know or understand everything about a situation. Questions take us beyond the obvious.

Generally, questions are seen as ways to elicit or exchange information, but much more importantly questions can,

  • unlock learning
  • fuel creativity and innovation
  • reveal how another person ticks, and
  • build relationships

The use of carefully framed questions is an undervalued tool in organizations and teams. Unfortunately, our education system does not seem to recognise the value of questions or the skills required to construct and use questions. Questioning is a skill to be honed. Our education systems emphasize advocacy at the expense of skilled inquiry.

Read more…

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Nine Dimensions of Team Development

The second handbook in a series on Team Development gives you a framework to guide your practical approach to developing your team.

Developing a team needs to occur across a range of perspectives and levels. A way of making sense of this is to consider team development on nine different dimensions.

Just enter you email address to receive your free copy of the handbook, Nine Dimensions of Team Development.

 

Jill Tideman

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Workshop: developing your presence & leadership with Michael Grinder

Michael Grinder will be known to many of Dalmau Consulting’s clients and colleagues, as the guru of non-verbal communication and leadership skills.

He is being hosted by the Leadership Foundation to come to Brisbane again in August and will run a 2 day workshop on Developing your presence and leadership. 

In the two day workshop you will learn a host of new skills in communicating non verbally with others and increase your effectiveness in non-verbal leadership. Skills include capturing others’ attention, handling disruptive people, how to manage others who are anxious, how to be more approachable and credible in your leadership.

The profits from this workshop will be donated to 3rd Space, a day respite centre for people experiencing homelessness in Brisbane.

Date: 6th and 7th of August 2018
Time: 9:00am to 5:00pm
Venue: Edinburgh Room, Brisbane Club. 241 Adelaide St, Brisbane
Dress Code: Business
Presenter: Michael Grinder

Parking: Discounted parking ($22 per day) is available at Queens Plaza

Click here to book your place.

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Team development: a guide

Teams are the core operational unit of all organizations – no matter how small or large. Forming, building and sustaining functional and high performing teams is at the heart of managers' roles, and yet is a constant dilemma for them – how to effectively develop teams?

 To assist, here is the first in a series of handbooks or guides for team development. It provides an introduction to what makes effective team development. Over the coming months, additional handbooks will be available that will provide a framework and practical activities and approaches to help you build a flourishing and performing team.

Just enter your email address below to receive your free copy of the Team Development Guide

Jill Tideman

 

 

 

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When institutions go bad

Tim Dalmau has written a thought-provoking paper, based on his reflections on governance and leadership arising from the recent revelations in the Australian banking industry. He explores parallels across a range of settings. Click here to download your copy of this paper.

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Workshop: developing your presence & leadership with Michael Grinder

Michael Grinder will be known to many of Dalmau Consulting’s clients and colleagues, as the guru of non-verbal communication and leadership skills.

He is being hosted by the Leadership Foundation to come to Brisbane again in August and will run a 2 day workshop on Developing your presence and leadership. 

In the two day workshop you will learn a host of new skills in communicating non verbally with others and increase your effectiveness in non-verbal leadership. Skills include capturing others’ attention, handling disruptive people, how to manage others who are anxious, how to be more approachable and credible in your leadership.

The profits from this workshop will be donated to 3rd Space, a day respite centre for people experiencing homelessness in Brisbane.

Date: 6th and 7th of August 2018
Time: 9:00am to 5:00pm
Venue: Edinburgh Room, Brisbane Club. 241 Adelaide St, Brisbane
Dress Code: Business
Presenter: Michael Grinder

Parking: Discounted parking ($22 per day) is available at Queens Plaza

Click here to book your place.

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Receiving feedback

It was Ken Blanchard who supposedly said that feedback is the breakfast of champions. Here are 8 simple tips for receiving feedback

Above all else breathe! Move your body (significantly), avert your gaze momentarily, and then take two deep breaths.

Do not look at the person. Do not maintain eye contact. Look to the side and nod your head in acknowledgement to the rhythm of the other person’s speech. Despite everything you have been told to maintain eye contact it is actually counter-productive when dealing with volatile information. It will only male you tense and slow down your thinking and do the same for the other person.

Never argue; just say thanks. Remember, another person’s feedback is about their experience of you not about you.

Don’t let any clarifying questions you have turn into a defense of your position.

Think carefully and slowly about what they have said to you. Don’t immediately reject or immediately reject what the other person has said

Go ask someone else whom you know for their frank honesty with you about how they see the issue and be careful when doing this not to “lead the witness”. In other words, triangulate the feedback.

Look for opportunities to stop doing or start doing critiqued behaviors.

If you feel the criticism was justified and you are better off for it, don’t forget to close the loop and share your progress with the feedback giver.

If you don’t know to change the behavior then ask for help or seek a coach.

Cathy Taylor

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Buy Tim & Steve’s Book

''A truly useful and practical book'' Rich Shapiro, EY

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