Archive for July, 2019

Excellent Leadership: above the Dunbar number

Robin Dunbar is an anthropologist and evolutionary psychologist; his fame largely focuses around a single number, 150. The theory of Dunbar’s Number suggests that 150 is the number of individuals with whom any one person can maintain stable relationships. It has formed the basis of a key element of Malcolm Gladwell’s Tipping Point, and the strategies that follow from that work.

If you are a leader of more than 150 people then who you are as a person and what you do in the immediate here and now is only one level of leadership. My colleague Tim Dalmau in his portrait of Candice paints some of the timeless principles and behaviors that go with effective leadership no matter what the setting. But these principles and behaviors work best in groups of less than 150. Read More…

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Becoming The Best You: the objective science and subjective techniques of highly functional people

Rattlesnakes, rabbits and rollercoaster-riders all have an autonomic nervous system: that is the part that keeps your heart beating and causes you to blink when a fly is about to hit your eye. Whilst much of this nervous system serves each group similarly, the really interesting thing is that each of these groups use this nervous system very differently.

Indeed, if you have ever taken a look around the reptile enclosure at a zoo, you’ll be lucky to see one of the reptiles do much more than barely move. They are behaviorally-challenged exhibits. Notice there’s never usually a flock of snakes or a swarm of iguanas: reptiles are not known for their pack mentality. And you’ll be conscious of the fact that, in the reptile world, herbivores are rare; and bigger reptiles tend to eat smaller ones, regardless of whether lunch is a member of their own species. Read More…

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Candice: a high performing leader

High performing leadership appears in the most surprising places and often when you least expect it. It might be the behavior of the Cabin Service Manager on a long-distance flight, the manager of Beauty and Health Clinic, or the behavior of the owner and duty manager of a restaurant. But when it appears the principles and behavioral elements are the same as those written about in text books, journals and magazine articles for global corporations, mining companies and financial service firms. The principles and behavioral elements of effective leadership are universal, it seems.

I opened the door into this up-market restaurant in Clare, a regional town in one of the best wine-making regions of Australia. I was struck immediately by the large number of close bodies – a seemingly impenetrable wall of talking, noise, music and clinking glass – hipsterville! Read More…

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Intangibles matter when designing organizations

When experts talk of the term organization design, they are referring to the operating model and processes, systems, capabilities and structures that underpin and organization and help it to deliver value to its customers and stakeholders, efficiently and effectively. Organization design is both an art and science! Read More…

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